How can I make my tank not smell???

Discussion in 'South American Cichlid Forums Neotropical' started by Guest, May 26, 2001.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I have a 55 gallon all glass corner tank. It smells horrible. It is the "center piece" of my living room but has turned in to a horrible stench that enveleopes the whole house. I do 15 gallon water changes weekly or biweekly. There is never more than two weeks between water changes. I have a emperor filter for 60 gallon tanks and a Whisper 3 filter for 60 gallon tanks. It has been up and running for about 3 months. I have cut back on feeding. I was feeding twice a day but now only feed in the evening. I really don't want to use chemicals to decrease the smell. I expected some sort of smell but it is overwhelming right now. AHHHHHH

    Please someone let me know what I am doing wrong!!!!!!!

    [This message has been edited by fauldsde (edited May 26, 2001).]
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Activated carbon will take care of the smell. It might need to be replaced in your filter with some fresh.

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    -Dave-
    And yes I am a fishaholic
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I personally just try not to sniff my tank /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif but the carbon does help
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    An aquarium should NEVER have a 'stench' to it. Sounds to me like your bio load is too much for the tank and you may need more filtering, or increased maintenance.

    Do you have bio-wheels? If you do, then that also contributes to the smell with your filter media being exposed to the air in you house. This action actually fans the smell into your house and that's why I do not use them. They're great filters, but I have a problem with that bacteria being spread into my living space.

    You can do the carbon, as suggested above, but I'd increase the # and amount of your water changes. Increase that to 30%-40% per week.

    Also note that a UV sterlizer is very efficeint at riding your tank of odors, but they are kinda pricey.

    ------------------
    -Jim
    Moderator - African Cichlids — SA Cichlids
    See our cats at: Mostly Maine Coons
    Fish stuff coming soon...
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Just wanted to throw in my 2 cents: My african tank has a slight smell to it too but only if I stick my nose really close to the water.

    Anyhow I just leave my canopy lids open all of the time. that seems to "air" it out. Also, do you have a powerhead? Position the powerhead near the water surface and set it to blow air. I do this at night, and it seems to help remove the smell.

    Someone told me the smell is caused by excess gas (I think hydrogen sulphate or something don't quote me on that) The air bubbles and extra surface agitation made my smell go away over night.

    Carbon, in my opinion, is a last resort.

    Hope this helps /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    It may not apply to your problem, but I have noticed that tanks with live plants are more likely to have a smell.
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I try to use carbon once a month or so to keep odors down. Carbon also gets rid of a lot of potentially harmful chemicals that might somehow get in your tank from time to time.

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    Joe Hackman
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    stances. Also keeps the water crystal clear along with fresh smelling water.

    I always change my carbon every month and always use it 24/7.


    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Somonas:
    Just wanted to throw in my 2 cents: My african tank has a slight smell to it too but only if I stick my nose really close to the water.

    Anyhow I just leave my canopy lids open all of the time. that seems to "air" it out. Also, do you have a powerhead? Position the powerhead near the water surface and set it to blow air. I do this at night, and it seems to help remove the smell.

    Someone told me the smell is caused by excess gas (I think hydrogen sulphate or something don't quote me on that) The air bubbles and extra surface agitation made my smell go away over night.

    Carbon, in my opinion, is a last resort.

    Hope this helps /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
    </font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



    ------------------
    HAPPY FISHIN!
    Jay Smout
    Moderator-African Cichlids
    Check out my fish www.thecichlid.cjb.net
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Ok now what about the thin white slime on the surface? it resembles an oil slick. I assume this is excess protiens. I think I might make the powerhead blow air again.

    <insert carbon debate here> I don't think carbon removes ammonia? unless biobacteria grows on it. But it has to be replaced every 4 weeks so you're removing any bacteria on it??
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Someone once told me that carbon strips out all of the good stuff in the water that Africans need. dont know what he could have been refering to. And he also told me that if you dont remove it in time the carbon will leach out all of the nasty stuff it removes from your tank all at once at toxic levels. though I have no proof of this its just what I had heard. What do you guys think?

    ------------------
    -Dave-
    And yes I am a fishaholic
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Carbon does eat up the ammonia, Damerf28... You are right about the carbon leaching out the bad bads, but that is why you change your carbon every month! doing this will assure you that you will have a great tank.



    ------------------
    HAPPY FISHIN!
    Jay Smout
    Moderator-African Cichlids
    Check out my fish www.thecichlid.cjb.net
     
  12. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I only use carbon when I need to. I used to run carbon all the time back in the 80's, but I rarely run it now. Maybe 4-6 times a year and then for only a week at the most.

    Carbon can bite you if you don't change it. It can actually become a haven for other bacteria if not changed regularly.

    I have never heard of carbon removing trace elements, but that doesn't mean it isn't so. I think a little research is due here gang so warm up your search bots and post relevant info in this thread.

    Post facts and sources please. If you're not sure about posting a link, PLEASE email me at jimdeford@home.com

    ------------------
    -Jim
    Moderator - African Cichlids — SA Cichlids
    See our cats at: Mostly Maine Coons
    Fish stuff coming soon...
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    e “chance” to be purified as it passes through the treatment process. Tap water filters are another example. Once the water exits the filter it cannot be “put back” and refiltered if some impurities were not removed. Aquarium filtration employs the dilution principle. A small portion of the total aquarium volume is removed, filtered, and replaced on a continuous basis. The idea is to remove pollution faster than it accumulates in the aquarium. This is why filter manufactures make different size filtration systems, they are matched to the volume of the aquarium. If the filter is too small or the flow rate too slaw the pollutants build up faster than the filter can dilute them. As activated carbon becomes exhausted the sorption rate slows down and organics begin to accumulate. Replacing the activated carbon with fresh material continues the purification process.

    Ideally aquarium water should be prefiltered before contact with activated carbon. Prefilters reduce the amount of particulate matter captured in between the carbon particles. Canister filters often provide an activated carbon chamber with prefiltration capabilities. Special carbon contractors maximize contact time and allow for floss fiber as a prefilter. Contrary to some authors, bags of activated carbon placed in the water flow work quite well. Laboratory studies have shown that bags of carbon or resins can remove substantial quantities of organic pollutants, medications, water hardness, and heavy metals. Actual performance depends on the flowability of the bag material, sorbent partical size, and amount of sorbent in the bag.

    Aquarists often ask how much activated carbon should be used in the aquarium. Some carbon products give recommendations while others give no indication at all. Independent research has shown that “more is better” when using activated carbon. When filtering municipal water or aquarium water a greater quantity of carbon will work faster and longer than a lesser amount. A rough guide would be two U.S. cups (480 c.c.) per 55 gallons (280 L.) of aquarium water. Some aquarists use more or less depending on their filtration system and quality of the carbon product they use. Most carbon products last about six weeks in a marine “fish” aquarium. Reef aquaria produce more organics than a regular aquarium and may require more frequent replacement. Activated carbon cannot be reactivated by boiling in water or heating in an oven, the temperature is too low to destroy the sorbed pollutants and restore sorptive capacity.


    Ozone Neutralization
    As mentioned earlier, activated carbon is used to neutralize ozone in marine aquariums. Ozone gas oxidizes the surface of the carbon particle reducing the ozone to oxygen. Excess unreacted ozone is released to the atmosphere through the “skimmer cup”. An activated carbon impregnated pad cut to fit on top of the cup instantly neutralizes ozone and prevents its accumulation in the home. The carbon pad turns white as the activated carbon is destroyed in the neutralization process.


    Medications
    Most aquarium medications are readily sorbed by activated carbon. Carbon products must be removed while treating with antibacterial drugs and antiparasitic chemicals (formlin, malachite green, copper sulfate.) Use fresh carbon to remove the medication after treatment is completed.


    Trace elements.
    Some marine aquarists worry that activated carbon depletes the aquarium of “trace elements”. While carbon has the potential to sorb certain metals considered trace elements in seawater, several factors must be considered. Activated carbon has a much greater affinity for organic compounds than metals. Foam fractioners (protein skimmers) and ozone “remove” substantial quantities of trace elements as does the metabolism of all the specimens in the aquarium. The benefits of activated carbon filtration, protein skimmers, and ozone far outweigh the possibility of trace element removal. There are many trace element additives available that replenish the “Essential elements” removed by algae, fish, and invertebrates as well as the filtration equipment necessary to maintain these specimens in captivity.


    Conclusions: Selection of a Carbon Product.
    As we have seen activated carbon is an important part of the marine aquarium filtration. Removal of organic “pollutants” increases water quality and promotes the health of marine specimens. Not all activated carbon products are equal in performance. So-called marine grade activated carbons may not be the most efficient or cost effective sorbent for the aquarium. Use this check list as a “starting point” when selecting carbon products for the marine aquarium”

    1) No chemical activation or washing with phosphoric acid, zinc or hydroxides.

    2) Macroporous structure: large pores of 30 Angstrom or above.

    3) Low Iodine Number: below 600

    4) High Molasses Number: above 400

    The most important factor is product performance in your aquarium. All aquarium carbon products claim to be the “finest available”. Contact the aquarium product manufactures for information then begin testing to see which product is really “the best”.


    ------------------
    HAPPY FISHIN!
    Jay Smout
    Moderator-African Cichlids
    Check out my fish www.thecichlid.cjb.net
     
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Heh! Ask and ye shall receive eh? That's very comprehensive! Great find, Jay.

    ------------------
    -Jim
    Moderator - African Cichlids — SA Cichlids
    See our cats at: Mostly Maine Coons
    Fish stuff coming soon...
     
  15. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Holey crap Batman! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Can we add that to our FAQ database?

    Jay email that article in text format to Bob Novak (pw@petswarehouse.com) and tell him where you got it.
     
  16. Guest

    Guest Guest

    /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif hey, you wanted info so I got it!

    On it's way soon Bob



    ------------------
    HAPPY FISHIN!
    Jay Smout
    Moderator-African Cichlids
    Check out my fish www.thecichlid.cjb.net
     
  17. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Pinch it's nose !

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    Man who go to bed with itchy butt, wake with smelly finger.
     
  18. rondha001

    rondha001 Newbie

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    I would suggest to make use of an air pump.
    I own a Tetra Whisper Air Pump (Non-UL) and am pleased to a huge extent with its functioning. It has been within its operation with regards to over a year or so without any sort of problems confronted. It possesses the capability of holding up to 100 gallons and I determined it to be one of the top 5 air pump found at present. Such air pump is not just priced low, but it contributes to a great functionality too. As far as muted operation and vibration dumping is taken into account, the pump owns attributes such as rubber feet and sound-suppressing chambers.

    I'd well and truly appreciate if you could kindly please share your views. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2017

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